Sunday, July 18, 2010

Faux Camera Shake

Here's a technique that you'd only find in a Fleischer cartoon. In Organ Grinder's Swing, de facto director Dave Tendlar chose to simulate a camera shake by flashing 2 different backgrounds - one normal and one distorted - shot on alternating exposures.

This was a smart move on Tendlar's part. (assuming it was his idea) Why you say?? Generally speaking, overlapping the actions of a camera shake and character animation would have weakened the action of the punches and lessened their impact. And for sure the action of Olive in the distance would have been lost.
Clever.







See it in motion...

10 comments:

RooniMan said...

Genius idea.

Mr. Cro said...

And WB's "restoration process" credited Bowsky. WB and their innatention.

Jeff Overturf said...

Very innovative. The mark of the Fleischer studio at their peak!!

J.V. (AKA "White Pongo") said...

I'd even go further and say it's a faux camera shake with lighting EFX simulating lightning. This further adds to the force of Popeye's punch. The impression is he could practically split the earth in half - very effective!

ROBERT said...

great innovative use [very psychological] of warped backgrounds: fantastic artistry from animation's true golden age.

Roberto Severino said...

Brilliant! Now this is why I love the Fleischer Studio so much. They were ahead of their time with such innovations.

J Lee said...

Tendlar also has a unique way of showing the fight at the end of "Fowl Play", where Popeye punches Bluto into the side of the house, but hit outline silhouette remains motionless while the rest of the body bounces back into place.

Jan said...

Aw... the Fleischer Bluto didn't deserve such drastic beatings! They should've saved them all up for the Famous Bluto! I can't quite understand why Bluto was given such an excruciatingly hard punishment in The Organ Grinders Swing. All he wanted was some peace and quiet, and then all the neighbourhood starts ganging up on him, pelting him with knives and flowerpots, while Popeye punches him on the chin... and that's BEFORE the spinach comes in!!

Bob, I have always wondered this. When, in cartoons, a character is punched or collides with a heavy object, a star-like shape briefly appears on-screen (usually yellow or red in colour) to illustrate the force of the impact. Do you know what the name for this thing is?

Bob Jaques said...

Jan - you could call that star effect a couple of things - hit, punch, or impact effects. I believe its origin is the graphic caricature of 'seeing stars'- the effect that happens when a human gets hit with something or bumps their head.

Café GOCHI said...

Hi Bob,
This camera shake tick is very neat.
One learns something new every day.
Cheers

Kiyoshi
PS: Say hello to Kelly.